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Firefly Music Festival Travel Tips

Wondering what to pack for the Firefly Music Festival? Here is a look at logistics: getting ready, how to “glamp”, etc.

Staying the whole weekend? In addition to available hotel accommodations, Firefly offers reserved campsites for a fee, but remember that they usually sell out quickly, and differ somewhat in terms of amenities and ease of access to the festival itself. The closer to the festival, the more the campsite will cost – festival veterans recommend splurging a bit for the best experience.

During the I-495 bridge closure, find alternate travel routes on the Delaware Tourism blog. Or visit the Firefly Music Festival transportation page for details on how to get to the event.   

From general tent/RV camping to Wednesday premier camping to glamping, Firefly fans can select which campsite meets their needs. Upgrades include access to the camping area on Wednesday (the day before the festival begins), closer proximity to the festival entrance, and even private restroom facilities.  

Even with the less-expensive options, campers get access to the part of festival grounds next to the raceway grandstands known as “The Hub,” where they can eat, drink, shop, shower or even dance and play volleyball. Of course, Dover is filled with retailers and convenience stores that can serve as resupply resources within a few minutes’ drive.

Firefly Music Festival What to PackWhat to pack for the Firefly Music Festival

Expect lots of walking (think comfy shoes), and lots of sun (think loose clothing, reusable water bottles and lots of sun tan lotion). And, of course, be wary of the ever-present chance of summer downpours (ponchos are perfect). Sunglasses are a must, and it’s a wise idea to tote a few washcloths, for sweat-mopping and spill-wiping. 

Once inside the festival gates, day-trippers and weekend campers alike will find it fairly easy to function without resorting to offsite excursions. Most areas are well marked, porta-potties and water bottel refill stations are plentiful, and attractions conveniently integrated into the flow from stage to stage.

“It’s pretty well organized, that’s for sure,” said Karen Blakely, 24, of Waterbury, Conn., during a break in the action. “No matter which stage you go to, you can get a good spot.”

Getting around the Festival

In most cases, the start of the next show is no more than a 10-minute walk away, and it’s nearly always possible to enjoy the music in relatively uncrowded surroundings if a journey into the mosh pit is not your cup of tea.

Of course, when you’re in a crowd of thousands, accidental separation from friends is always a possibility, making Firefly’s “Meet Me” booths handy landmarks to remember. Plenty of other prominent attractions could serve as temporary refuges from the outdoor action, from the Dogfish Head Brewery pub, to The Arcade, to the Toms shoe-painting tent, to the air conditioned Heineken Domes.

You may even find yourself spending a lot of your time in what has practically become an emblem of the Firefly experience – the campgrounds where festivalgoers have turned their cars and their sites into little homes-away-from-home.

“We can pop in to hear some music, then we can pop right out and come back here,” said Connecticut resident Francesca Lafferty, 20, as she took a break at the campsite she shared with friend Mike Lambert.

99 Kings Highway • Dover, DE 19901 • 1-866-284-7483
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